Extraordinary claims. Ordinary investigations.

Bloody UFOs

“Felix Fernandez, Omar Gonzalez and Virgilio Moreno, workers at the Direccion Provincial de Vialidad (Provincial Highway Authority) were returning from La Junta toward the city of Malargue in the south of the province of Mendoza after having worked on some machinery. As the journey elapsed, Fernandez took pictures of the landscape with his cell phone (of which no data is available to this day).

At 18:50 hours, a strange flying object – disk shaped – appeared out of nowhere and maneuvered in front of the sun and the witnesses. It flew over the area for 15 minutes until standing still for a moment and losing itself toward the west in the El Chacal region. This allowed several photos to be taken of it.

The episode was retold by Fernandez himself on Alvear’s Radio 1 and recently reached the media. Analyzes performed by our specialist, Jorge Luis Figueiras, shows a typical solid ‘saucer’ shape with interesting contours and edges, similar to the ones photographed with cell phones at El Chocon and Santiago del Estero, both in 2008.” [MDZ, translation by Scott Corrales, IHU]

I quoted the whole report/news item because the alleged “flying object in front of the sun” was in fact the sun. There’s little doubt about that, as even if there was a real flying object “in front of the sun” it couldn’t possibly appear the way it does in the image.

That and the fact that photographing the sun directly with a cell phone camera, though, may produce exactly the effect seen in the image. Continue reading for more.

See, for instance, this other “UFO in front of the sun” now in Michigan:

See the similarity? A few years ago, the Brazilian UFO magazine also published a familiar photo and report that read:

Static point in the sky: I was distracted when I saw a fixed point in the sky. The weather conditions were good, but the visualization of the object was difficult, as I was staring against the Sun. What intrigued me was that for around 15 minutes, the object didn’t move. And as it appeared suddenly, from nothing, it disappeared the same way. I have no witnesses to the fact, as I was alone at the moment.”

Our reader Diogo Rodrigues Gonçalves called our attention to the report, and sent along a photo. Not the original, but a reproduction:

Diogo explained how he captured this other “static point in the sky” in a short sentence: “You just have to photograph the Sun, the area that becomes too bright actually turns black, simple as that!”. Half of the world must have witnessed that object in the sky at the same time.

The effect is a problem with electronic image sensors, which play the part of the old film negatives. Instead of a burned film, when the image is too bright our digital cameras end up with those artifacts, effect of saturation, which may also extend in strange horizontal or vertical shapes, going along the electronic paths in the sensors, on what’s called bleeding or blooming .

Those artifacts, including the spots so bright they turn black, are more common in cheap cameras, with cheap sensors and cheap processing chips, exactly as those on cell phones and not so expensive video cameras. Such as those used on Argentina and Michigan.

CCD bleeding even went to space, but on expensive satellites under extreme conditions. And have thus been source of confusion or just plain opportunistic exploitation by some UFO buffs, who around 2003 claimed that the SOHO satellite captured giant flying saucers around the Sun:

NASA actually publicized a page clarifying the mess. Which also went religious, as can be seen in this alleged “miracle of sun at Medjugorje, Herzegovina June 25, 2006”:

As Shakespeare said, “Know thy camera sensor, o Fortean lovers”. [via Marcianitos]

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Posted in UFO photos,UFOs | 2 comments

2 Comments so far

  1. […] ya se que Kentaro Mori los llamó ovnis sangrantes, pero para mi son ovnis sangrones (no se cómo explicar este […]

  2. CJames October 14th, 2010 12:54 pm

    “Those artifacts, including the spots so bright they turn black, are more common in cheap cameras, with cheap sensors and cheap processing chips, exactly as those on cell phones and not so expensive video cameras. Such as those used on Argentina and Michigan.”

    This is not specifically true. This phenomenon can occur with photo paper or film inside of a traditional camera. Infact, this can also occur with instant film, like a Polaroid or Instax. Essentially, the sun burns the paper or film in that area. There is an artist whose work frequently employs the use of burning the photo paper with the sun so that there’s a hole in his image – basically doing what this article describes to the extreme.

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