Extraordinary claims. Ordinary investigations.

The Tiny Chilean Alien: a Toy story

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“Concepción, Chile – On October first of 2002, while vacationing in the Southern Chilean city of Concepcion, a group of family members found what appeared to a small humanoid creature. The miniscule being measures about 7.2 centimetres long. It has a relatively large head, two arms with longs fingers, and two legs. (…) The child allegedly picked it up and wrapped it with a piece of paper. The child claims that it stayed alive for about eight days, and in some instances, it even opened its eyes.

Nevertheless, after supposedly being dead for a few days, the small creature displays signs of advanced decomposition; it even appears to be in a strange state of mummification. Specialists from the University of Chile pointed out to a possibility that it might be a foetus from local wild life, such as a wild cat. However, they have not reached a conclusion to determine the exact species the supposed foetus could be scientifically associated with. They expect to carry out DNA testing in order to come up with a conclusion.”
[Ufocasebook: Tiny Alien Found in Chile?]

The child is Armando Henríquez Carreño, then 15-years-old. His uncle, Julio Carreño, was also involved in the promotion of the creature, which was named “Toy”. Yes, it was named Toy.

Shortly after the media exposure in the local cable TV, came the first “specialists”: some ladies who claimed they had special powers and who could talk telepathically with the creature. Not even Armando’s mother, Luisa, was able to believe them.

Then came the local ufologists.

Mario Dussuel claimed “it doesn’t have the proper characteristics of a human foetus nor those of an animal”. Eric Martínez and Enrique Sariego from “Corporación para Investigación OVNI” (CIO) were also there to investigate.

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When things had a momentum, came someone to ruin everything. Veterinarian and professor of the University of Santo Tomas, Arturo Mann, analyzed the specimen and stated that:

“After a preliminary analysis, without seeing it in ‘macro’ fashion, I have concluded that it is earthly. In other words, a little animal, a mammal that presents hair, nails, fingers. It is very earthly and even terrestrial, which is to say, it’s not a flying animal, as it shows appendages suited to walking and even for digging, with long nails. The body shows some damage, possibly from animal predation or poor care [in the handling] of this little animal.”

And what exactly was it?

"It is a small mammal, known as a micromammal, specifically a marsupial and given the region it was found, would correspond with a high degree of certainty to a "monito del monte". To reach the conclusion that it is this "monito" or a marsupial, we are mainly based in the fact that the anterior members present five fingers with an opposable thumb. This means that the animal can grip branches using its hand. That’s why it’s called "monito" (little monkey).”

A little marsupial that looks like a rat.

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That made the ufologists very unhappy, and it’s interesting to note that they tried to get their own specialists to analyze the creature, including a DNA analysis. That would surely show that Mann was wrong and this was an alien.

But as Luis Ruiz Noguez notes, “when the moment of truth came, they backed out”. According to them, Eric Martínez received several threats in his cell phone demanding him to stop the investigations, and in their public announcement attributed it all to “the pressure exerted against both the family and our investigations director”.

Who could be trying to silence the truth? Was there really something here? Why any superficial comparison between a monito del monte bones and the “Toy” creature clearly shows some differences? We demand answers!

Fortunately, the creature was also analyzed by a Japanese TV show, which took X-rays of it. Japanese TV shows are not particularly known for their serious analysis on such subjects, but in this case they did quote the opinions of doctor Tadaaki Imaizumi, from the Japanese Zoological Institute.

X-ray From a visual analysis, Imaizumi also considered that this was probably a mammal. And from an X-ray analysis, he was able to determine it had seven bones in the neck, which is a pretty good evidence this was indeed a mammal.

It had, however, also some evidence that the body had been messed with, especially in the jaw. Noguez also suggests that the nose may have been manipulated, as well as the legs, to make it more difficult to identify. That explains the superficial differences with a common monito del monte skeleton.

Because that was also the conclusion of doctor Imaizumi, that this was a marsupial.

The TV show then mentioned that as they weren’t able to see any teeth, this was still a mystery and a DNA analysis was forthcoming, which would really settle things. I think this was added only because they couldn’t end the show saying there was no mystery at all in this Toy story.

But as it happens, there isn’t. It was a marsupial.

– – –

Reference

Noguez, L., “Toy Story”, Extraterrestres ante las cámaras, vol.2, pp. 167-183.

Far East Research Co., ????????????????????, 01/25/2004

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